The Migration and Mental Health Database

Compiled by a scientific committee of international academics in collaboration with the Documentation Center of the Swiss Forum for Migration and Population Studies / National Center of Competence in Research –The Migration-Mobility Nexus (NCCR) at the University of Neuchâtel (Switzerland), the ‘Migration and Mental Health’ database is a comprehensive collection of academic resources which focuses specifically on the topic of migration and mental health.

To understand mental health, we draw on the definition provided by the World Health Organization whereby: ‘Mental health is defined as a state of well-being in which every individual realizes his or her own potential, can cope with the normal stresses of life, can work productively and fruitfully, and is able to make a contribution to her or his community.’ As such, it incorporates a significant consideration of the social, cultural, political and economic environment. We are specifically interested in focusing on the mental health issues related to vulnerable populations and forced migration – the coerced movement of a person or persons away from their home or home region – including undocumented migrants, asylum seekers and refugee populations.

The database uses bibliographic research technologies to identify new publications with the selection of keyword attributions ensured by an international scientific committee of expert academics in the field. The project consists of a fully searchable online version of the bibliography of scientific publications from the year 2000 to the present, with systematic and continual updates from September 2016. It thus aims to provide a free major hub for those concerned about issues of mental health among migrant populations. As such, it is open to those in an academic field (researchers, teachers, students, lecturers), practitioners working clinically with this populations who would like to update their academic knowledge as well as interested citizens. All are warmly invited to add to this collaborative project by submitting articles to the scientific committee.

Source: About – Migration and Mental Health

What’s So Special about Canada? Understanding the Resilience of Immigration and Multiculturalism | migrationpolicy.org

Canada has in recent decades occupied a privileged place among the world’s top immigrant-receiving countries. Despite weathering many of the same economic and political challenges that have buffeted support for immigration in other countries—from recession to threats of terrorism—Canada has managed to maintain a consistently positive public consensus around its immigration system.

While Canada has a long history of immigration, since the 1980s policies governing new arrivals have, to a large degree, been tied to demographic and economic considerations. Permanent residents admitted for economic reasons comprised roughly 60 percent of all admissions to Canada over the past five years. Polls suggest that this is in line with public preferences: in a 2011 survey, for example, 69 percent of Canadians thought immigration policy should prioritize nationally relevant education and skills. Canada’s geographic isolation from global conflicts or extreme poverty has safeguarded its selection system from mass arrivals or large-scale unauthorized flows. Furthermore, the diversity of immigrant arrivals to Canada—in  2014, new permanent residents came from nearly 200 countries—has ensured that any conception of “the immigrant” is not reduced to one ethnic, racial, or religious identity.

Canadian attitudes sympathetic to immigration and globalized cultural diversity took time—and, arguably, political will—to develop. This Transatlantic Council on Migration report explores the evolution of Canada’s apparently unique attitude toward immigration and diversity by presenting a snapshot of the country’s public opinion polling on immigration, and discussing the matrix of social policies, institutions, and institutional practices that have driven this positive consensus.

Source: What’s So Special about Canada? Understanding the Resilience of Immigration and Multiculturalism | migrationpolicy.org

Health considerations in the Syrian refugee resettlement process in Canada

Abstract

Canada has responded to the humanitarian emergency in Syria by committing to welcome 25,000 Syrian refugees by early 2016. This has been a complex undertaking which required coordination between international organizations, such as the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), the International Organization for Migration (IOM) and federal government departments, including Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC), the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA), the Department of National Defence (DND) and the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC). Within and across Canada, this initiative has also required the collaboration of provincial and municipal governments, non-governmental organizations and volunteers, including private sponsors, to enable planning for the transition of Syrian refugees into a new life in Canada.

In planning for the reception of Syrian refugees, government agencies did not anticipate major infectious disease threats. However, early findings from Europe and the experience of health care providers who serve other refugee populations suggested that this population may have other unmet health needs and untreated conditions, due to their experience of displacement over the past three to four years. With this in mind, a great deal of planning has been undertaken to address potential challenges to public health. Social services providers and medical interpreters have been enlisted to help Syrians access the health care system and explain their needs. Communities of practice within Canada have responded, both in providing care and in developing and updating tools and resources to support a culturally sensitive and evidence-based approach to screening and meeting the health needs of the Syrian refugees.  Read Article

Vidéo : Ghayda Hassan – Lignes directrices pour guider le travail auprès des immigrants

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Dr. Ghayda Hassan est professeur en psychologie à l’université the Québec à Montréal. Elle est l’une des auteurs des lignes directrices cliniques fondées sur des preuves pour les immigrants et les réfugiés. Dans cette entrevue elle aborde des lignes directrices pour la santé mentale des immigrants et des réfugiés au Canada. Elle explique les raisons pour lesquelles ces lignes directrices sont nécessaires. La santé des populations migrantes est souvent influencée par les mêmes aspects des déterminants sociaux que celui des autres Canadiens, mais aussi par d’autres déterminants en raison de leur statut de migrant. Ceux-ci incluent des obstacles à l’intégration sociale et économique, les barrières d’accès aux services sociaux et de santé en raison de la langue et les différences culturelles, le manque de réseaux sociaux. C’est important de reconnaitre ces obstacles peuvent également exercer une influence significative.

Working Together: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Mental and Health and Wellbeing

Telethon Kids Institute – Working Together 2nd Edition.

We are pleased to announce that the 2nd Edition of Working Together: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Mental and Health and Wellbeing Principles and Practice 2014 is now available online. The editors are Pat Dudgeon, Helen Milroy and Roz Walker.

The book is intended for staff and students and all health practitioners working in areas that support Indigenous mental health and wellbeing. Working Together offers a high quality, comprehensive examination of issues and strategies influencing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander mental health and social and emotional wellbeing.

The new book includes several new chapters. It examines issues across the life course, with a greater focus on children and young people; the significant impacts of mental health in the justice system; the cultural determinants of social and emotional wellbeing and intellectual and development disabilities.  It includes holisitic models of care, as well as interdisciplinary and inter-professional approaches and working with carers to deliver an even more robust text and resource.

Working Together: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Mental Health and Wellbeing Principles and Practice 2014 was funded by the Australian  Government Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet, Telethon Kids Institute/Kulunga Aboriginal Research Development Unit in collaboration with the University of Western Australia.

The book is available in hard copy as well as on line. You can download book chapters directly from the website.

Joseph P. Gone on Cultural Competence

“We are all embedded in cultural processes and practices… we have a lot of assumptions and orientations that are cultural themselves these are not always shared with the people we work with.”

Joseph P. Gone, PhD, Associate Professor of Psychology (Clinical Area) and American Culture (Native American Studies) at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor talks about cultural competence: what is it, what is the relationship between evidence-based practice and cultural competence and how does cultural competence relate to mental health care and mental health care for Indigenous populations in particular?

For more information on Dr. Gone, please visit his website www.gonetowar.com

Lost in Translation: Mental Health of Newcomers

Lost in Translation: Mental Health of Newcomers – New Canadian Media

An interview with Dr. Jaswant Guzder on issues of access to mental health care for immigrants and refugees and the importance of interpreters. Includes discussion of suicide, psychosis, depression, and cultural consultation.

Equal Benefit for Minorities From Psychotherapy, Study Finds

Members of racial or ethnic minority groups benefit just as much from psychotherapy as do members of the white majority in Western countries, according to a report in Psychiatric Services in Advance.

Researchers from Vrije Universiteit (VU), University Amsterdam, and the EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research looked at 56 randomized, controlled trials among adults that compared psychotherapies with usual care or a waiting list. The most common treatments were cognitive-behavioral therapy (in 32 trials) or interpersonal psychotherapy (11 trials).

“Our overall results suggest there is little reason to assume that psychotherapy is less effective for racial-ethnic minority populations compared with nonminority populations,” concluded the authors. “Because our meta-analysis did not give strong indications that psychological treatments work differently between specific racial-ethnic minority groups, more attention should be paid to the gap between effective mental health care and the delivery of these services.”

Psychiatric Services 2014; doi: 10.1176/appi.ps.201300165

The authors are with the Department of Clinical Psychology, VU University, Amsterdam, the Netherlands, and the EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research (e-mail: b.unlu@vu.nl).