About the Immigrant and Refugee Mental Health Project (IRMHP)

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The IRMHP is a training and capacity-building project funded by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada. It provides online training, tools and resources to settlement, social and health service providers across Canada to support their work with newly-arrived immigrants and refugees.

 

The IRMHP encourages individuals to participate in the project by:

1.       adding your name to our course sign-up list. we will notify you once course registration is open, as spots are limited. The Immigrant and Refugee Mental Health online course is a free, self-directed, interactive training providing an overview of immigrant and refugee mental health. It provides sample tools, evidence-based strategies and interventions, and innovative practices from across Canada to help offer appropriate services and supports to newcomer client populations. The course will launch fall 2018.

2.       joining the IRMHP community of practice (CoP) discussion board or subscribe to the IRMHP newsletter. These virtual communities allow you to stay up-to-date on events and resources in the sector, network with service providers across Canada, and share promising practices.

3.      participating in the IRMHP monthly webinars, which are open to anyone working with newcomers. They are on a range of topics based on the needs and interests identified by service providers, and offer practical and actionable strategies or resources to support or treat the mental health needs of immigrants and refugees.

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No One Is Illegal – Vancouver » Blog Archive » Border Rights for Refugees: A multilingual guide

Source: No One Is Illegal – Vancouver » Blog Archive » Border Rights for Refugees: A multilingual guide

Thousands of refugees are crossing the Canada-U.S. border, many fleeing escalated sociopolitical, white supremacist, misogynist violence and I.C.E raids in the U.S.

In the first two months of this year, approximately 2000 refugee claims were filed at land ports of entry along the Canadian border. In Quebec alone there are six times more land-border refugee claims than in the same period last year. RCMP have intercepted or arrested (not yet charged) 1,134 refugees – nearly half as many asylum seekers in three months as all of the previous year.

Hundreds have been forced to cross irregularly under dangerous and life-threatening circumstances. People who have contacted us and our networks are primarily from Somalia, Syria, Iraq, Turkey, Djibouti, Ghana, Nigeria, and Mexico.

The Canadian government and corporate media’s rhetoric about ‘welcoming refugees’ is misleading. There are many discriminatory and unjust barriers, such as the Safe Third Country Agreement that the Canadian government refuses to rescind, and a difficult legal system for refugees to navigate if coming through the U.S. This guide is to better inform and support those making the difficult decision to cross yet another colonial border.

The guide is produced by No One Is Illegal and the Immigration Legal Committee of the Law Union of Ontario. Supported by the African-Canadian Legal Clinic.

About – Migration and Mental Health

THE MIGRATION AND MENTAL HEALTH DATABASE

Compiled by a scientific committee of international academics in collaboration with the Documentation Center of the Swiss Forum for Migration and Population Studies / National Center of Competence in Research –The Migration-Mobility Nexus (NCCR) at the University of Neuchâtel (Switzerland), the ‘Migration and Mental Health’ database is a comprehensive collection of academic resources which focuses specifically on the topic of migration and mental health.

Source: About – Migration and Mental Health

Digital Humanitarianism: How Tech Entrepreneurs Are Supporting Refugee Integration | migrationpolicy.org

Tech communities in Europe and North America have been spurred into action by the refugee crisis, developing apps and other tools that can be used along the journey, immediately upon arrival, and for longer-term integration into the host society. This report maps several types of emerging tools and considers how policymakers responsible for refugee integration might play a more active role in supporting the most promising.

Source: Digital Humanitarianism: How Tech Entrepreneurs Are Supporting Refugee Integration | migrationpolicy.org

Health considerations in the Syrian refugee resettlement process in Canada

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Abstract

Canada has responded to the humanitarian emergency in Syria by committing to welcome 25,000 Syrian refugees by early 2016. This has been a complex undertaking which required coordination between international organizations, such as the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), the International Organization for Migration (IOM) and federal government departments, including Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC), the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA), the Department of National Defence (DND) and the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC). Within and across Canada, this initiative has also required the collaboration of provincial and municipal governments, non-governmental organizations and volunteers, including private sponsors, to enable planning for the transition of Syrian refugees into a new life in Canada.

In planning for the reception of Syrian refugees, government agencies did not anticipate major infectious disease threats. However, early findings from Europe and the experience of health care providers who serve other refugee populations suggested that this population may have other unmet health needs and untreated conditions, due to their experience of displacement over the past three to four years. With this in mind, a great deal of planning has been undertaken to address potential challenges to public health. Social services providers and medical interpreters have been enlisted to help Syrians access the health care system and explain their needs. Communities of practice within Canada have responded, both in providing care and in developing and updating tools and resources to support a culturally sensitive and evidence-based approach to screening and meeting the health needs of the Syrian refugees.  Read Article

Health Status of Syrian Refugees – Public Health Agency of Canada [PHAC] report, 2016

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This briefing from the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) provides a short background to the  Health Status of Syrian Refugees and an overview of the measures  put in place by the PHAC to address it.

MHCC Report: Supporting the Mental Health of Refugees to Canada

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Supporting the Mental Health of Refugees to Canada outlines the MHCC’s work on immigrant and refugee mental health to date, summarizes current evidence and promising practices for refugee mental health, and advances recommendations for how the MHCC can support the arrival and integration of Syrian refugees to Canada.