Mental health medication information in Chinese (Med Ed)

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https://vimeo.com/96611241

in this Cantonese video, Dr. Kenneth Fung discusses the Chinese version of Med Ed, a booklet which helps teenagers with mental health issues to understand their medication and its side effects and to help them track their side effects, symptoms and changing dosage.

The first of its kind, Med Ed is for people who are thinking about or are already taking medications for mental illness or related symptoms. It includes answers to common and less common questions about these medications as well as checklists and other tools to make tracking symptoms, activities, and side effects easy. Brief information is provided about medications known as antidepressants, antipsychotics, anti-anxiety and sleep medications, stimulants, and mood stabilizers. There are tools to help keep track of the medications, by name, dose, and directions, and a glossary to help understand the many different terms.

It was originally developed, in English and French, by Drs. Murphy, Gardner, and Kutcher of Dalhousie University in collaboration with the Ontario Centre of Excellence for Child and Youth Mental Health at CHEO. In collaboration with the Multicultural Mental Health Resource Centre at McGill University, versions of Med Ed have been developed in Arabic and Chinese.

Med Ed is available on this website in English, French, Arabic and Simplified Chinese.

Le centre de ressources multiculturelles en santé mentale et Bell Cause pour la cause

Le Centre de ressources multiculturelles en santé mentale (CRMSM) fournit de l’information et des outils aux cliniciens en plusieurs langues, dont l’arabe, le mandarin, l’espagnol et le persan. Lors de l’administration des soins, il est important de porter attention aux différences culturelles puisque certaines attitudes concernant la santé mentale peuvent varier selon les cultures. Le soutien de Bell Cause pour la cause permet au CRMSM d’accroitre l’accessibilité à l’information sur la santé mentale en rejoignant les gens de la communauté qui sont moins à l’aise avec la langue française ou en anglaise.

Bell Cause pour la cause annonce un don pour améliorer les services du Centre de ressources multiculturelles en santé mentale


(Vidéo en anglais)

Bell Cause pour la cause annonce un don de 250 000 $ à l’Institut et hôpital neurologiques de Montréal de l’Université McGill qui servira à financer le développement de ressources en santé mentale en ligne axées sur les besoins des communautés multiculturelles.

Ce projet d’une durée de trois ans permettra d’améliorer les services du Centre de ressources multiculturelles en santé mentale (http://www.multiculturalmentalhealth.ca/fr/) en élargissant les options de langues et le contenu en arabe, en persan, en mandarin et plusieurs autres langues, et en ajoutant des ressources destinées aux adolescents, aux jeunes adultes et aux membres des familles de personnes atteintes d’une maladie mentale.

Cultural Humility

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https://youtu.be/SaSHLbS1V4w

Cultural Humility is a 30-minute documentary by San Francisco State professor Vivian Chávez. The film tells stories of successes and challenges, and the road in between for those working to develop partnerships among community members, practitioners and academics. It encourages us to realize our power, privilege and prejudices, and be willing to accept that acquired education and credentials alone are insufficient to address social inequality.

Mental Health First Aid training for leaders from spiritual communities

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Building Bridges for Inclusive Care is an initiative being implemented by the Peel Service Collaborative which has dedicated itself to building bridges between the formal and informal (e.g. faith-based) mental health and addiction support systems in PeelThe Peel region has one of the highest religious affiliation rates in the Greater Toronto area and for many believers, their spiritual community is one of the first places to turn to for help.  In recognition of the informal support faith communities play in mental health care, community leaders are invited to take part in Mental Health First Aid training.
 
During the first week of March 2014, ten leaders from spiritual communities completed a 2-day course on Mental Health First Aid for adults who work with youth.  The leaders were a diverse group including Buddhist Venerables, a Muslim Imam, and Anglican priests, amongst others. To date, 33 leaders from faith communities have been trained through the 14-hour Mental Health First Aid program.  An initiative of the Mental Health Commission of Canada, the Mental Health First Aid program has been shown to reduce stigma, raise awareness, and provide tools to support and connect community members in need with formal mental health support.  
 
For more information on the Mental Health First Aid program offered throughout Canada, please visit: http://www.mentalhealthfirstaid.ca/EN/Pages/default.aspx
 
If you are a leader from a spiritual community in the Peel region and you are interested in taking an upcoming course in Mental Health First Aid, offered at no cost, please contact Sarah Waldman at sarah.waldman@camh.ca or call 416-535-8501 X 36608

 

Vidéo : Ghayda Hassan – Lignes directrices pour guider le travail auprès des immigrants

Dr. Ghayda Hassan est professeur en psychologie à l’université the Québec à Montréal. Elle est l’une des auteurs des lignes directrices cliniques fondées sur des preuves pour les immigrants et les réfugiés. Dans cette entrevue elle aborde des lignes directrices pour la santé mentale des immigrants et des réfugiés au Canada. Elle explique les raisons pour lesquelles ces lignes directrices sont nécessaires. La santé des populations migrantes est souvent influencée par les mêmes aspects des déterminants sociaux que celui des autres Canadiens, mais aussi par d’autres déterminants en raison de leur statut de migrant. Ceux-ci incluent des obstacles à l’intégration sociale et économique, les barrières d’accès aux services sociaux et de santé en raison de la langue et les différences culturelles, le manque de réseaux sociaux. C’est important de reconnaitre ces obstacles peuvent également exercer une influence significative.

Joseph P. Gone on Cultural Competence

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https://vimeo.com/98659677

« We are all embedded in cultural processes and practices… we have a lot of assumptions and orientations that are cultural themselves these are not always shared with the people we work with. »

Joseph P. Gone, PhD, Associate Professor of Psychology (Clinical Area) and American Culture (Native American Studies) at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor talks about cultural competence: what is it, what is the relationship between evidence-based practice and cultural competence and how does cultural competence relate to mental health care and mental health care for Indigenous populations in particular?

For more information on Dr. Gone, please visit his website www.gonetowar.com

What is Med Ed?

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When it comes to medications for mental illness, my 25 years of experience tells me that you can only assume one thing with reasonable accuracy: people have strong feeling about taking medications for mental illness. I’m a professor of psychiatry and a pharmacist. A lot of what I do is meet with families to speak with them, individually or in support groups, to talk about medications for mental illness. While no two stories are the same, there are a few common themes, for example concerns about side effects, becoming dependent (“addicted”) and a wish for more effective medications – finding that magic pill. 
 
There are widely available resources (written and electronic) that provide information about medications for mental illness (the so-called psychotropic medications), but what they provide is information not the ability to make an informed treatment decision. To do this requires selecting and combining the right information that fits the context of the full “story”. What is the diagnosis? Is it a classic picture of this diagnosis or is there a lot of uncertainty about it? What other health problems (mental and physical) exist? What past treatments, medications and otherwise, have been tried? What were the experiences with those treatments? What personal supports are in place? What is the individual’s preferred options and why?   There is only one way that I know of that helps people make informed medication decisions and it is not by giving them a bunch of reading, it is by giving them information that is relevant and putting that information in context. Then they are armed to truly participate in the decision. It is with this in mind that Med Ed was conceived.   
 
The first of its kind, Med Ed is for people who are thinking about or are already taking medications for mental illness or related symptoms. It includes answers to common and less common questions about these medications as well as checklists and other tools to make tracking symptoms, activities, and side effects easy. Brief information is provided about medications known as antidepressants, antipsychotics, anti-anxiety and sleep medications, stimulants, and mood stabilizers. There are tools to help keep track of the medications, by name, dose, and directions, and a glossary to help understand the many different terms.
Nearly every component of Med Ed encourages dialogue and a team approach to making decisions and for monitoring how the treatment is going. It provides mental health medication education and treatment tracking for people of all ages. It was originally developed, in English and French, by Drs. Murphy, Gardner, and Kutcher of Dalhousie University in collaboration with the Ontario Centre of Excellence for Child and Youth Mental Health at CHEO.  Now, in collaboration with the Multicultural Mental Health Resource Centre at McGill University, new versions of Med Ed have been developed in Arabic and Chinese.

Med Ed was created using the best available evidence regarding use, design, impact of medication resources and management of mental illness. The intention is to provide patients, their families, and health care providers with information and tools about medications for mental illnesses that help them work together to better plan and track the effects of the medications. Unlike most health and medication information resources, Med Ed encourages face-to-face discussions involving patients, families, and health providers so that the most important issues get discussed.
 
For more information about Med Ed, please visit http://medicationinfoshare.com

David Gardner
Professor of Psychiatry and Pharmacy
Dalhousie University

Med Ed is available on this website in English, French, Arabic and Simplified Chinese.

Podcast: MedEd (in Arabic)

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http://vimeo.com/93411749

Dr. Yasser Ad-Dab’bagh discusses the Arabic version of MedEd, a booklet which helps teenagers with mental health issues to understand their medication and its side effects and to help them track their side effects, symptoms and changing dosage.

Podcast: Common mental health problems among immigrants

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In this podcast, Dr. Laurence J. Kirmayer describes the key points of the common mental health problems review of the Canadian Collaboration for Immigrant and Refugee Health Evidence-based clinical guidelines.

Key points:

  • Among immigrants, the prevalence of common mentalhealth problems is initially lower than in the generalpopulation, but over time, it increases to become similar tothat in the general population.
  • Refugees who have had severe exposure to violence often have higher rates of trauma-related disorders, including post-traumatic stress disorder and chronic pain or other somatic syndromes.
  • Assessment of risk for mental health problems includes consideration of premigration exposures, stresses and uncertainty during migration, and postmigration resettlement experiences that influence adaptation and health outcomes.
  • Clinical assessment and treatment effectiveness can be improved with the use of trained interpreters and culture brokers when linguistic and cultural differences impede communication and mutual understanding.

This podcast was made with reference to the following paper:

Kirmayer, L. J., Narasiah, L., Munoz, M., Rashid, M., Ryder, A. G., Guzder, J., . . . Pottie, K. (2010). Common mental health problems in immigrants and refugees: general approach in primary care. Can Med Assoc J. doi: cmaj.090292 [pii]
10.1503/cmaj.090292